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Scarlett, West Hills, California

Scarlett, West Hills, California

The healing power of perceptive clarity

"Wishful thinking" has a negative connotation in the modern parlance. It implies that we are crippled by a perceptive disability. All thinking is, in fact, wishful thinking. Thinking is informed by our perceptive filters and the judgements we accept as absolute. This acceptance is erroneous. My perception changes with my emotional state (which depends on sleep, food, or arbitrary mood swings) or with my level of resistance to the world and my place in it.

My thoughts themselves are unreliable as a barometer of the flow of nature. My ego, that easily distracted identity that masquerades as the true self, is not to be trusted with a task as weighty as discerning the truth.

Good luck silencing the ego. It gets louder the more we try to squelch it. Perhaps ego control is a fool's errand. We might do better to silently witness this ego and its machinations. Once the ego becomes aware that it is being observed, it's power over us dissolves, and we can see the workings of nature and our place therein without a fight for control.

If we become more accepting of nature's part in our makeup and our part in her overall flow, we can become more right-sized.

Consistent meditation expands our sense of identity beyond the ego and its flighty concerns. We become more grounded, more calm, more stable.

If we become opened to the beautiful gifts nature gives us on a daily basis, we can relax and enjoy the world for what it is. Heaven on Earth.

Skyview, dusk, West Hills, California

Skyview, dusk, West Hills, California